Category Archives: Uncategorized

Virginia Indian Heritage by Dr. Wood

Talk by Dr. Karenne Wood of the Virginia Indian Program on the history and culture of Virginia’s Native American peoples. Sunday, August 27, 3:30 to 4:30 at Pohick Regional Library.  Dr. Wood is the director of the Virginia Indian Programs … Continue reading

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Archaeological Functions

by Elizabeth Paynter – CART Lab Director When identifying and cataloging artifacts, archaeologists have several methods to increase the understanding of a site based on the collection of artifacts found. One of these methods used is classifying artifacts by function. … Continue reading

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Fairfax 275: “Beginning from a White Oak Tree”

CART principal investigator and FCPA Senior Archaeologist Christopher Sperling, Gunston Hall Director Scott Stroh, and Fairfax County History Commissioner Debbie Robison discuss history, road, maps and people of Fairfax County. http://www.ebmcdn.net/fairfax/fairfax-county-viewer-cc.php?w=768&h=432&viewnode=ffx_275_beginning_white_oak_may_17 Also check out other interesting videos about 275th Fairfax County Anniversary. … Continue reading

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Shell Edge

by Colleen Boyle – CART Archaeological Technician Recent excavations by CART have recovered different types of ceramic artifacts, one type being shell edge refined earthenware. These sherds can be identified through their characteristic molded or embossed rims, some of which have … Continue reading

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CART Biweekly Update

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More on Eighteenth Century Buttons

by Jean Cascardi – Archaeology Crew Chief The last time we talked about buttons on the blog we briefly discussed the three W’s of the eighteenth century button: Whose clothing were typically made with buttons, what these buttons were typically … Continue reading

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Projectile Points – Contracting Stems

by Elizabeth Paynter – Archaeological Laboratory Director A projectile point stem shape that helps identify and type projectile points is the contracting stem. A contracting stem is simply a stem that tapers (or contracts) towards the base. Contracting stems can … Continue reading

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