Category Archives: Archaeology

Raise a Glass to the New Year!

  We hope you had a wonderful holiday! It seems fitting that at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, we have found a few fragments of the base of stemware. Pictured below, the folded base rims date to about 1680 to … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology, Artifacts | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Bottle Finishes

by Colleen Boyle – CART Archaeological Technician Hand-blown glass bottles have a variety of different styles depending on the intended use of the bottle, and when it was made. A bottle finish is a term used to describe the parts … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology, Artifacts | Leave a comment

North American Gray Stoneware

by Emma Saaty – CART Archaeological Field and Lab Intern History: North American Stoneware was first produced in the English colonies of North America in the early 1700s, and was heavily influenced by British and German traditions. North American Gray … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology, Artifacts | 2 Comments

Getting Artifacts Clean in the CART lab

by Daphne Ahalt – CART Assistant Lab Director This week’s blog post is a review of the procedures used in the CART lab to wash artifacts recently excavated in the field. The word “wash” is a bit misleading because not … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology, Artifacts, Volunteers | Leave a comment

What is a Unit?

by Charles Simpson – CART Archaeological Technician As an archaeologist who has been working in the field for 3 years, I have had the pleasure to do a variety of projects across the East coast. When an archaeological survey is … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology | 1 Comment

Buckley

by Elizabeth S. Paynter – CART Lab Director “The blending of two clays of different colors…was not always done for ornamental purposes; it could also serve to make a poor clay more workable. This technique was characteristic of potters of … Continue reading

Posted in Archaeology, Artifacts | Leave a comment

Glass Bottle Pontil Scarring

by H. Sumner Bridenbaugh – Archaeological Field and Lab Intern Pontil Scarring Pontil scarring can be useful in understanding how and when a glass bottle was made. Firstly, it indicates that the bottle was hand-made, either free blown or blown … Continue reading

Posted in Artifacts | 2 Comments